Category Archives: Articles

The 2009 Lambing Season has begun!

I could not wait for lambing season to begin, so I brought home a triplet bottle baby. Her name is “Eve” and here she is at 24 hours old.  She has been a very healthy, active little baby from Day 1. And, above is one of our lambs who is not even born yet! Most of our ewes have been ultrasounded – we do this to feed the mothers of twins correctly and not overfeed singleton mothers. We will have a small early Spring group and a late spring group. The late Spring lambs will be the perfect age for the early 2010 fairs such as the Texoma and Collin County fairs. They will be weaned and vaccinated by about the time school starts. Our earliest mama ewe, Diva, is due in mid January – she was a Champion so […]

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Sheep Care Tips from 1871

I bought a cover of an American Agriculturalist magazine from April, 1871, because it had Southdowns in Central Park on the cover. On the back, it has a section “Hints about Work” and reminds the shepherd of the tasks that should be done in April: “Tag any that need it. For mild cases of scours, nothing is better than milk-porridge, made with wheat flour — say a pink of milk and a tablespoon of flour for each sheep. For severer cases, give prepared chalk, or ten drops of laudanum, repeating the dose every four or five hours till the discharges are arrested. Give gruel and tonics to keep up the strength of the animal. Salt regularly, and mix a little sulphur with the salt — say three pints of salt and half a pint of sulphur, twice a week, for […]

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Pics from the N. Texas State Fair, Denton

We took Nigel (Dapkus 03) and Tinkerbell (Dapkus 04) to the fair in Denton, in the Open Breeeding Sheep show. Nigel won a ribbon for Reserve Breed Champion! He has a lot of eye appeal, good muscling and growth (especially for his young age and breed), and a nice, long body and neck. And yeah, he’s pretty fat. Tinkerbell was the fattest lamb at the entire fair! Too bad they don’t give out ribbons for that. Don’t let your show lambs nurse almost up until fair time! (I knew that, but I just couldn’t do it….). Anyway, in these pics, they are a few days short of 5 months old.

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Taking Home Your New Lamb

Sheep are flock animals, and separation from the flock is one of the most stressful things imaginable for a sheep. Anything you can do to make the move less stressful for him will keep your lamb healthier. Here are some tips based on my experience, the experiences of others, and research papers I have read. Transportation: If you don’t have a sheep/goat carrier, most young Southdown lambs will fit in a large dog kennel (i.e., Lab/German Shepherd size). I suggest using bungee or rubber cords to reinforce it, because lambs can bash their way out of things (including cable ties, so don’t rely on those unless you use a lot of them). If the weather is warm, add shade but don’t cut off air circulation. Tie a tarp or sheet down well because flapping objects make sheep nervous. Feed: Ask […]

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